Home Trending Marta Gonzalez | This Alzheimer’s Ballerina Recalling Her Choreography Is Going Viral

Marta Gonzalez | This Alzheimer’s Ballerina Recalling Her Choreography Is Going Viral

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Marta Gonzalez

Marta Gonzalez | This Alzheimer’s Ballerina Recalling Her Choreography Is Going Viral: Even if you don’t know it, music and dance can help you connect to your body. A viral video reveals just how powerful that link can be, however.

Marta Gonzalez | This Alzheimer’s Ballerina Recalling Her Choreography Is Going Viral

Marta Gonzalez

First She Uploaded The Video On Facebook

One of New York Ballet’s most famous prima ballerinas, Marta C. González, is shows in the video. As she listens to Swan Lake from her wheelchair, González appears to be reenacting the ballet’s choreography.

She died in 2019 of Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of dementia. Although she has Alzheimer’s disease, González seems to have an immediate emotional and physical connection to the music she had danced to on stage.

Also, the video of her recalling the choreography is likely to leave you in awe. An Alzheimer’s and dementia patients’ group in Spain, the Asociación Msica para Despertar, first posted the video on its Facebook page.

But thanks to the likes of Jennifer Garner, Antonio Banderas, and globally acclaimed choreographer Arlene Phillips. As of right now, it’s making the rounds on the web.

Music, movement, and the arts are “wonderful,” Garner said on Instagram with a video of González’s performance. “This ex-recollection ballerina’s of Swan Lake melts my heart.

Everybody involved in the fight against Alzheimer’s disease, thank you.” When it comes to boosting your brain power, exercising is a no-brainer.

In a Facebook post, Banderas said he hoped that the video would serve as “a well-deserved acknowledgement of [González’s] work and her devotion.”

She Has Long-term Memory Loss

Choreographer and Grease and Wizard of Oz choreographer Julie Phillips wrote in her blog. That the film “hurt her heart” to see because of González’s “glimpses of memories.” She commented, “How precious if music and dance can repair or hold memory.”

Even though Alzheimer’s and other kinds of dementia generally cause catastrophic memory loss. It appears that music (and movement) can assist preserve specific memories. It might explain why González remembered the Swan Lake choreography from her youth.

An article in the Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s Dimensions journal explains the link between music, dancing, and memory recall. Dementia risk can be dramatically reduced by regular exercise, according to a new study.

According to Rhoads: First of all, “complex cross-body movements of dance” require a workout for the procedural memory system. When it comes to motor abilities like walking, driving, riding a bike, etc.

Procedural memory is a type of long-term memory related to acquired movement sequences (think: motor skills like walking, driving, etc.). Alzheimer’s patients’ long-term memories may be able to compensate for the loss of short-term memory.

Music and memory are also explored in the 2014 documentary Alive Inside (which aired on PBS). According to neuroscientist Oliver Sacks, MD, “Music has more power to engage more areas of the brain than any other stimuli” is heard in the documentary’s teaser.

As Concetta Tomaino, the executive director and co-founder of the Institute for Music and Neurologic Function, put it: “We have a portal to stimulate and reach someone who’s otherwise unreachable.”

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